Newest FAQs

Pricing Validity

How long will Portland Bolt hold pricing?

To answer simply, as long as we possibly can.  At the time of quoting, our pricing reflects the current costs that we are faced with.  Technically, quoted prices are “for immediate acceptance.” With increases in cost, such as steel, always being a possibility, we can only guarantee pricing at the time of quoting.  This does... Read more

Certified Mill Test Reports

What is a “CMTR”?

The acronym CMTR stands for, “Certified Mill Test Report” or “Certified Material Test Reports.”  As a manufacturer, it is imperative that we are using the correct raw material when manufacturing a given part, whether it is a bolt or fabricated steel plate.  A CMTR is provided by the raw material producer (mill), which is a... Read more

ASTM A47 vs. A48 vs. A536

What is the difference between ASTM A47, A48, and A536?

ASTM A47, A48, and A536 are all casting specifications. Each grade has its own strength requirements and base material used. Each grade is also commonly associated with a particular finished part that Portland Bolt stocks. ASTM A47 ASTM A47 covers ferritic malleable castings intended for general use at temperatures from normal ambient to approximately 750°... Read more

Custom Packaging

Does Portland Bolt provide custom packaging?

Yes Portland Bolt offers custom packaging. Many of our light rail customers have us fully assemble the OCS foundation bolts marked with the foundation type. This allows them to simply drop the fully assembled bolts into their location. This also frees up their people from the task of field assembling product they may not be... Read more

A490 vs F3125 Grade A490

What changes have occurred to the ASTM A490 specification since it was incorporated into the F3125 specification?

In December 2015, ASTM committee F16 approved the new F3125 standard, which combined six structural bolt standards, A325, A325M, A490, A490M, F1852, and F2280. The goal was to clean up inconsistencies within those various standards and combine them, so that future updates would be easier and less costly. The goal was not to drastically change... Read more

A325 vs F3125 Grade A325

What changes have occurred to the ASTM A325 specification since it was incorporated into the F3125 specification?

In December 2015, ASTM committee F16 approved the new F3125 standard, which combined six structural bolt standards, A325, A325M, A490, A490M, F1852, and F2280. The goal was to clean up inconsistencies within those various standards and combine them, so that future updates would be easier and less costly. The goal was not to drastically change... Read more

Stainless Yield & Tensile Strength

What are the strength and yield values for stainless steel bolts?

Typically when bolts are ordered, they are called out by a specific ASTM or SAE grade. Stainless steel bolts are a bit different though, as they are commercially available and regularly ordered simply by the material itself, most commonly 316 or 304 stainless steel. Unlike bolts that fall under ASTM specifications, there are no specific... Read more

RCSC

What is the RCSC?

RCSC is the Research Council on Structural Connections. It is a non-profit, volunteer organization, comprised of over 85 leading experts in the fields of structural steel connection design, engineering, fabrication, erection and bolting. Its goal is to support research and gain knowledge to publish standards in structural steel connections.

Lock Washers with A325

Can I use a lock washer in an A325 structural connection?

Looking through both the ASTM specification F3125 Grade A325 and the Research Council on Structural Connections (RCSC) website, we have found neither mentioning the use of lock washers in a structural steel connection.  We interpret this as neither allowing nor forbidding the use and that it would ultimately be up to the engineer of record... Read more

Stainless Grade 55 All Thread

Can I get stainless steel all thread rod in grade 55?

The reference to “Grade 55” is for getting a stainless steel all thread rod with a minimum yield strength of 55,000 psi.  There are currently no stainless steel specifications commonly stocked that will guarantee a 55,000 psi yield strength. The most commonly stocked grades of stainless all thread rod are A193, A320, and F593. The... Read more