Dane's FAQs

Calculating Grade 8 Shear Strength

What is the shear strength of Grade 8 bolts?

A common question that we get here at Portland Bolt is in regards to the shear strength of bolts. The shear strength is the value at which the lateral stress on a bolt or screw causes it to fail. It is an important factor to take into consideration when designing structural steel or timber connections.... Read more

Thread Engagement

How much thread engagement is recommended, i.e. how many threads should extend beyond the nut?

This is a difficult question to answer. Depending on your application, the answer could be anywhere from 1/2 engagement, up to having two full threads extend beyond the nut. Look at these conflicting answers found in four separate technical publications. Federal Highway Administration, “Guidelines for the Installation, Inspection, Maintenance and Repair of Structural Supports for... Read more

Weight Gained from Galvanizing

How much weight is gained from hot-dip galvanizing bolts?

According to the American Galvanizers Association (AGA) the weight of an item on average will increase about 3.5% from the zinc added during the galvanizing process. However, the AGA goes on to say, “…that figure can vary greatly based on numerous factors. The fabrication’s shape, size, and steel chemistry all play a major role, and... Read more

High Strength Bolts Coatings

What corrosion-resistant coatings are available for high-strength (over 150 ksi) bolts?

Due to hydrogen embrittlement concerns ASTM recommends against hot-dip galvanizing , mechanical deposition, or electroplating with zinc or other metallic coatings on high strength bolts ultimate tensile strengths that exceed 150 ksi. So what are the alternatives to provide corrosion resistance for A490 structural bolts? Protective Coatings ASTM recommends that if a protective coating is... Read more

Bolt Thread Length

Is there a standard thread length for bolts?

Depending on the type of bolt you are using the thread length can vary greatly. There is not an inclusive thread length standard that covers all fasteners. Depending on the applications, manufacturer, and a number of other factors the amount thread may change. It is important to clearly communicate at time of purchase your desired... Read more

Tie Rod Assembly Configurations

How are tie rods, turnbuckles, and clevises configured?

Tie rods, clevises, and turnbuckles are an important part of many architectural designs. Canopy supports, structural steel bracing, and walkway hangers are a few of the applications that use these assemblies. The unique configuration allows for field adjustments in both length and tension. Adjustment Adjustments are possible by threading opposing ends of the rod right hand... Read more

Rotational Capacity Testing

What is rotational capacity (ROCAP) testing?

Per ASTM A325 section 6.3.1, the rotational capacity test is defined as a test, “that is intended to evaluate the presence of a lubricant, the efficiency of the lubricant, and the compatibility of assemblies as represented by the components selected for testing.” In a 1970 study referenced by the Research Council on Structural Connections (RCSC),... Read more

ASTM Letter Designations

What do the letters at the beginning of an ASTM standard signify?

Every ASTM standard is identified by a unique designation. It includes a capital letter (A – H), followed by a serial number ranging from one to four digits, a dash, and finally the year of issue. For example, a common bolt specification is A449 – 07a, although when specified the standard’s year designation is usually... Read more

Metric Bolts – We Convert

Do you manufacture metric bolts?

All bolts we manufacture are made to imperial measurements. The primary reason for this is because the steel used to make bolts is milled to imperial sizes. Even though metric measurements are almost exclusively used internationally, most raw materials are only available domestically in inches. Often projects, such as highways, bridges, and power plants specify... Read more

Clevis Pin Question

When using a clevis pin and using a cotter pin, or a spring pin, or a spring clip, or a retaining ring to capture the outer end, my practice has always been to place a washer under the retaining device to discourage deformation and/or loss of the retaining device due to rotation of the clevis pin. Who agrees out there?

It seems like this question is directed toward clevis pins that are used to connect control assemblies, linkages and perhaps hinges. In these applications where rotation of the clevis pin is anticipated, I agree that a washer would protect the retaining device from possible ‘side effects’ of the rotation. In the case of pins that... Read more