How are tie rods, turnbuckles, and clevises configured?

Tie rods, clevises, and turnbuckles are an important part of many architectural designs. Canopy supports, structural steel bracing, and walkway hangers are a few of the applications that use these assemblies. The unique configuration allows for field adjustments in both length and tension.

Adjustment

Adjustments are possible by threading opposing ends of the rod right hand (RH) and left hand (LH). Another alternative is to provide two clevises threaded RH and use a turnbuckle in the middle that has RH and LH threads. The assembly length and tension is adjusted by rotating the turnbuckle. Both options allow the assembly to be installed and easily adjusted in place.

ClevisGrip
The grip on a clevis refers the distance between the legs. This is the area that will be placed over the plate and held by a pin. Generally, the grip size is calculated by the material thickness plus ¼”. Keep in mind the minimum grip is ¾” for #2 through #5 clevises and 1” for #6 and #7.

Pin
Clevis with PinClevis pins are available headed or smooth and are generally secured with a cotter pin connection. In some applications an ASTM A325 structural bolt can also be used to connect the clevis to the structure. Refer to the Diameter of Pin in Inches chart on the clevis page for the appropriate pin dimensions. This chart is designed so that the pin will surpass the matching rod strength.

Galvanizing

Hot-dip galvanized clevises and turnbuckles are available. It is crucial for correct fit that the clevises and turnbuckles are tapped oversize to account for the additional thickness from zinc on the tie rods. To ensure the proper fit Portland Bolt assembles all parts prior to shipping.

Common Layouts

Tie_Rod1
Tie Rod with Two Clevises and a Turnbuckle
Tie_Rod2
Tie Rod with Two Clevises Only

More information about tie rod assemblies and what information you need to order them correctly is available at our educational website www.tierodassemblies.com and in the FAQ: How to Order Tie Rod Assemblies

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8 comments

    We have a structural wall 10′ h. x 30′ l. that has tilted out at top of one end by 1 1/2″.
    What diameter tie rod with a turnbuckle can be used through a 1/2″ x 12″ x 12′ plate on each end to stabilize the wall? The opposite structural wall is stabile.

    I need to supply an allthread rod with a thread pattern that will screw into your 1-3/8″ turnbuckle Portland Bolt Part No. 18727.

    What tread pattern must be specified for the allthread rod?

    Sirs….I have a rough sawn old barn beam that is sagging [in a great room] holding up the roof and I would like an old look with a turn buckle so I can put a couple of lag bolts in it on both ends and have the turn buckle in the middle and crank it tight so as to help the beam not get any worse for sagging…..
    Sort of like your tie rod with 2 clevises and a turn buckle…I would like the rods to be big enough to give the integrity that it would need and the look that it would need to blend in with the old wood axed marked beam…the over all length would be 12′ 6 3/4″ from one end to the other with the turnbuckle in the middle…I think the rods should be at least 1/2″….Your thoughts? and cost? also…is there a pc. of some thing I could put in the middle by the turnbuckle to hold the unit down a little to allow us to tighten up the turn buckle?
    delivery to: Gerry Frencik…… 66566 Larrick Ridge Road…….Cambridge, Ohio 43725………
    Thank you and I will look forward to your email…….Gerry….Questions?…cell 740 584 5836

    Looking for tie rod and turnbuckles for a greatroom with antique barn beams for top of walls. They need to be pulled in and these would remain and be exposed.
    Can you give me a rough estimate of delivery to NH?

    @Terry – One of our estimators will be contacting you in order to get some more details about this job.

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