Bolt Industry FAQs

Clevis Numbers

Why are clevises called out by a number?

Clevises are a component of tie rod assemblies that rods thread into. Unlike most other female threaded components such as nuts or turnbuckles, calling out a clevis size by the diameter of rod being threaded into it is not the correct way to reference it. Clevises are called out by a number, ranging from a... Read more

Bolt Length

Does the length measurement of a bolt include the head?

In most cases, when specifying the length of a headed bolt, the thickness of the bolt head is not included. For instance, if you were to order a ¾” x 24” hex head bolt, the bolt would measure 24” from under the head. One exception to this method of measurement is countersunk bolts. When specifying... Read more

Clevis

High Strength Clevises & Turnbuckles

Are high strength clevises and turnbuckles available?

High strength clevises can be provided in instances where smaller clevises are needed while keeping a higher safe working load. High strength clevises are also used to develop the full capacity of high strength threaded rods. Since high strength clevises are not readily available in the marketplace, these items and can add significate lead time... Read more

Rural Utilities Service

What is the RUS or the Rural Utilities Service?

The United States Rural Utilities Service (RUS) is in charge of administering programs that provide rural communities with infrastructure or infrastructure improvements. The programs administered by the RUS include water and waste treatment, electric power, and telecommunications services. The RUS is a part of the USDA Rural Development Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture. The RUS provides assistance... Read more

20′ All Thread

Are twenty foot lengths (20’) of all thread rod available?

20’ lengths of all thread rod are not commercially available off the shelf and would have to be custom made to order. In most instances, all thread rod is cut to length and it is more economical to use more sticks of standard 12 foot and shorter sizes. If a 20 foot connection is needed,... Read more

1/2″ x 1″ Structural Bolts

Are ½” A325 Structural Bolts available in 1” length?

A325 structural bolts start at ½” diameter with the shortest length available being 1-1/4”. As far as the ASTM specification is concerned, there is not an official documented reason as to why they are not readily available; however when asked to provide 1” length, we have found that they are not easily obtained in the marketplace.... Read more

1/2″ A490 Bolts

Why can’t I find 1/2” diameter A490 bolts?

ASTM F3125 Grades A490 and A325 structural bolts are mass-produced through 1-1/4” diameter. However, there is an exception for 1/2” A490 bolts. Compared to other diameters, these are not commonly used. Therefore, 1/2” diameter A490 bolts are not mass-produced and are not readily available in the marketplace. There are a couple of ways to work around this. First,... Read more

Hex Lag Screw

Lag Screw vs Lag Bolt

What is the correct way to refer to a lag, screw or bolt?

Although these terms are used interchangeably, lags should be referred to as a screw and not as a bolt. A bolt is a fastener with machine thread that can accept a nut. A bolt is properly assembled and tightened by rotating the nut. A screw, on the other hand, is a fastener that is properly... Read more

Tap Bolt vs Cap Screw

What is the difference between a tap bolt and a cap screw?

A tap bolt is (typically) a fully threaded hex bolt, while a cap screw is (typically) a hex head bolt that will be installed by turning the head of the bolt (screw) instead of tightening it with a nut. Usually cap screws are being threaded into something (a piece of machinery for example), rather than... Read more

Odd Plastic Anchor Sleeve Diameters

Can plastic anchor sleeves be used with metric diameter anchor bolts or less-common diameters such as 1-1/8” or 1-3/8”?

The typical fix to this issue is to buy a larger sleeve for the next imperial (inch) diameter up and duct tape the sleeve to the rod to fix it in place. A less-frequently used alternative is to buy a smaller sleeve and cut the sleeve to fit the anchor bolt. According to our customers... Read more